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Author Topic: Dietary Restrictions for Gout  (Read 34 times)

rudolfwood

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Dietary Restrictions for Gout
« on: July 31, 2016, 10:49:15 am »
Dietary Restrictions for Gout - Gout and Related Symptoms
Quote
Gout is a problem that develops after a long period of increase of uric acid crystals in the joints and surroundings tissues. Unwanted symptoms are developed because of gout. These may include warmth, pain, swelling, extreme sensitivity in joints. One of the most seen cases of gout is big toe joint problem, also called podagra. Other symptoms of gout include pain during the night and repeatedly and rapid increase of discomfort lasting for some hours, followed by an easing of the pain in the next days. This pain may last from 2 to 7 days.

The most common affection is the big toe joint problem. Even is this affection is noticed in most of the cases it is not excluded that other joints of the feet, ankles, knees, wrists, fingers or elbows to be affected too.

As Most of the Health Problems Gout Symptoms are Related to Other Medical Conditions
Other problems with symptoms similar to those of gout are rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis or joints infected with bacteria. Unlike gout rheumatoid arthritis often occurs in hips and shoulders which are usually spared in gout. The symptoms are about treatment of gouty arthritis too. An infected joint cause's similar symptom with gout but the treatment involves intravenous antibiotics and hospitalization.

By the time people notice the symptoms of gout attackthe uric acid has surely been building up in their blood and had also deposit in one or more of their joints.

The first phase of gout, nodules, also known as tophi, appear on the hands, elbows or ears but afterwards different symptoms may develop in each case.

Gout Symptoms May Vary from Case to Case
In some cases gout symptoms may occur after an illness or after a surgery. Cases of people developing rare painful attacks are known but it is also known that people might develop chronic gout even if they do not experience often painful attacks.

  • Gout is a disease that may lead to purplish skin around the affected joint.
  • It may look as an infected area.
  • Fever is another possible symptom developed because of gout.
  • Another problem surely is the limited mobility of the affected joints.
Gout is a Common Disease and Often Presents Suddenly With a Painful Joint
The most common and well-recognized symptom is swelling of the joint in the big toe where it joins the foot. This can be extremely painful and enlarged and if not treated the pain will last about 10 days and can cause lasting damage with repeated attacks. The area can be red, hot, inflamed and very painful or tender. :o.

  • Over the long term there can be deformity of joints and there can be many large lumps under the skin.
  • Nowadays with proper treatment this is less likely.
  • The symptoms can last from three to ten days and often get better even without treatment.
  • The next attack may occur many months or even years later.
  • Usually (and fortunately) only one joint is affected at a time and the symptoms of the swelling and pain start within a day.
  • Kidney stones can form due to gout and can cause back pain.
  • Other joints such as the knee, fingers and heel can also be affected.
  • Some people get lumps on the rim of the ear or other parts of the body near joints under the skin and these are called tophi.
People May Have an Elevated Uric Acid Also Called Hyperuricemia but Have No Symptoms
Later they may develop acute gouty arthritis where the joint is affected. Almost three fourths of people with gout will develop it in the big toe at some point of time. In between attacks what helps gout pain said to be in an interval or intercritical phase and finally some people get chronic tophaceous (with the tophi) gout.

The definite diagnosis or determining if the arthritis is due to gout may involve drawing fluid from the joint and looking for crystals of uric acid.

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